07.16.18

The incivility of (too-) civil society in the tuberculosis response

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Anyone who knows the world of the global tuberculosis response knows, too, its refrain: “We must do for TB what we did for HIV!” It is less rallying cry than lament.  Those of us who form part of “civil society” at the international level in the TB world attend the big TB conferences, but mostly […]

Posted in Global Health, TB, uncategorized ; Tagged: , , , , , , , .

07.13.18

The Importance of Disease Surveillance: The Case of Zika Virus Disease

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Surveillance is an important part of tracking any disease because it serves as an early warning system, identifies public health emergencies, guides public health policy and strategies, and helps to understand and monitor the epidemiology of a condition to set priorities and guide public health policy and strategies.  Zika is an excellent example of the […]

Posted in Global Health, Infectious Diseases ; Tagged: .

07.11.18

UNICEF: Implementing Human Rights for Child Health

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This article was written by Benjamin Mason Meier, Associate Professor of Global Health Policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Mitra Motlagh, the Head of UNICEF’s Human Rights Unit, & Kumanan Rasanathan, the former Senior Adviser in UNICEF’s Health Section. The longstanding efforts of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to implement human […]

Posted in Global Health, Health and Human Rights, Human Rights ;

07.11.18

A Need for Greater Participation of States in Handling the Hepatitis C Epidemic

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This blog post was authored by Dr. Daniel Lising, Research Assistant for the O’Neill Institute’s Hepatitis Policy Project. Daniel is a graduate of Georgetown University Law Center with an LL.M in Global Health Law. As the scourge of the opioid crisis continues, an often-overlooked consequence is the increased proliferation of blood borne illnesses such as […]

Posted in Hepatitis C, Hepatitis C Staff Insights, uncategorized ;

07.02.18

Schools need to prepare us for the world, not only the workforce

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Long ago, psychologists recognized that children are not simply mini-adults. Similarly, children are not simply future workers. They are current and future citizens of the world, citizens (or otherwise participants in) of our democracy, members of their individual communities. That – along with giving short thrift to critical functions of the Labor Department, such as protecting […]

Posted in Human Rights, uncategorized ; Tagged: , , , , , .

06.29.18

The Modernization of North Carolina’s HIV Criminal Laws and Its Consequences

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On January 1, 2018, a new rule took effect in North Carolina that modernized the state’s HIV control measures. Although there is no specific HIV-related criminal statute in North Carolina, the North Carolina Commission for Public Health is authorized to adopt rules that prescribe control measures for communicable diseases and conditions, including control measures for […]

Posted in HIV ; Tagged: , .

06.26.18

The Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health Calls for a Rights-Based Approach to Tuberculosis

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  In the lead up to the United Nations High-Level Meeting on Tuberculosis to take place in September, on June 18th the Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health released an open letter emphasizing that states must commit to a rights-based approach to tuberculosis. The letter highlights that current levels of progress levels fail to […]

Posted in Global Health, Human Rights, TB ; Tagged: .

06.19.18

Celebrity Suicide and the Risk of Contagion

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  The recent deaths of fashion designer Kate Spade and celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain shocked the world.  It is especially upsetting for people who feel like they have nothing to live for to look at wealthy celebrities who seemingly have it all (fame, money, success) and yet still feel like taking their own lives is […]

Posted in Resources, WHO ; Tagged: , , , .

06.18.18

What happens today matters: a last chance to save the Political Declaration of the United Nations High Level Meeting on Tuberculosis

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Today, the United Nations General Assembly will, for better or worse, shape the next decade of the global response to the world’s deadliest infectious disease. Millions of people will feel the decisions made today. Millions of lives will be won or lost as member states barter and jockey over the content of the Political Declaration […]

Posted in Global Health, Human Rights, TB, uncategorized, WHO ; Tagged: , , , , .

06.11.18

Is this what the normalization of genocide looks like?

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It wasn’t long ago that the ethnic cleansing – quite probably genocide – against the Rohingya people of Burma (Myanmar) made headlines. Beginning near the end of August last year, the most recent and violent episode of a gathering storm of discrimination, deprivation, and destruction, the Burmese military murdered at least 9,000 Rohingya, quite possibly many […]

Posted in Human Rights ; Tagged: , , , , .

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The views reflected in this blog are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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