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Monthly Archives: July 2016

07.29.16

Why We Need Anthropologists During Public Health Emergencies

By Rebecca Reingold

Anthropologists play a key role in responding to public health emergencies, particularly infectious disease outbreaks. However, in the early stages of the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa, many of the response teams sent by Doctors Without Borders, the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. military, etc. failed to include anthropologists. In the face of resistance to treatment […]

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07.20.16

Strengthening Immunization in Conflict-Affected Countries

By O’Neill Institute

Nicholas J. Diamond, J.D., LL.M., M.B.E. Earlier this month, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nation Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) released the latest data on global immunization coverage. While the data showed evidence of improvement in global immunization coverage, progress remains short of global immunization targets set by the Global Vaccine Action Plan […]

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07.19.16

Big Tobacco’s Challenge Goes Up In Smoke, Public Health Breathes Easy

By O’Neill Institute

This post was written by Neiloy Sircar, J.D.-LL.M Global Health Law Candidate 2017 and summer research assistant at the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law and Sarah Roache, Institute Associate. Any comments or questions about this post can be directed to nrs53@georgetown.edu. The July 8 ruling in favor of the government of Uruguay in the case […]

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07.11.16

Reflections on Indifference and Human Rights

By Eric A. Friedman

Indifference. In a word, that was the enduring evil against which Elie Wiesel – the Nobel Peace Laureate and Auschwitz survivor who died earlier this month – struggled, indifference to avoidable anguish. In a 1999 White House address raising the perils of indifference, Elie Wiesel offered these reflections: Of course, indifference can be tempting – […]

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07.08.16

Viral Hepatitis is the seventh leading cause of death worldwide: Yet U.S. treatment interventions continue to go underfunded

By Sonia Canzater

An article published on July 6, 2016 in The Lancet ranks viral hepatitis infections – specifically both Hepatitis B (HBV) and Hepatitis C (HCV) – as the seventh leading cause of death worldwide in 2013, up from tenth in 1990. Where other infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, malaria and diarrheal diseases saw sharp declines over this timespan, HBV […]

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07.07.16

Two years and counting: cannabis legalization efforts are starting to paint a clearer picture

By Fernanda Alonso

By Philipp Nagel and Fernanda Alonso  A month ago, rumors spread that the DEA was about to reschedule cannabis from a Schedule I to a Schedule II drug in the Controlled Substances Act. Even though this rescheduling would not have many impacts in terms of legalization, it would allow derivatives of cannabis to be made available […]

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