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Monthly Archives: December 2017

12.31.17

The Use of Confinement in the Name of Public Health

By Drew Aiken

Photo: Smithsonian Magazine Throughout recent history, confinement has been justified by countries on purported ‘public health’ grounds to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. However, too often the practice of confinement leads to egregious rights violations through overly-broad use of isolation or other forms of confinement, which sometimes includes excessive and lengthy duration and tends […]

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12.20.17

#MeToo: Who is being left out?

By Rebecca Reingold

This year’s #MeToo movement has triggered a national reckoning with sexual harassment and misconduct in the U.S. However, the movement began 10 years ago when Tarana Burke founded a nonprofit organization aimed at supporting survivors of sexual harassment and assault. Tarana explains that “from the start of #MeToo going viral and the recognition of my years […]

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12.15.17

Stop. Think Twice. How Are Your Charitable Donations Really Being Spent?

By Mehgan Gallagher

  It’s that time of year when people are feeling more generous than ever.  Many Americans are donating to charitable organizations such as the Red Cross or the Salvation Army.   Due to the surge of devastating natural disasters that struck the country this past year, many people have made additional contributions to help the victims rebuild […]

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12.08.17

Planning for Success: Adequate Funding for Hepatitis C Surveillance and Monitoring is Vital to Achieving Elimination

By Sonia Canzater

This blog post was written by Sonia Canzater and Jeffrey S. Crowley of the O’Neill Institute, and originally published on December 6, 2017 on the HepVu blog. The original post can be found here.    These are the facts: An estimated 3.9 million Americans are infected with Hepatitis C Between 2010 and 2015, Hepatitis C incidence […]

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12.04.17

Syria’s Disappeared and Humanity at Its Worst – and Best

By Eric A. Friedman

[I thank Noor Shakfeh, a Syrian-American who has lost family members to the Syrian regime, and Sara Afshar, who directed and produced Syria’s Disappeared, for inspiring this piece, and for deepening my own understanding of solidarity.] Though they have disappeared from the headlines, the depravities of the Syrian regime during the war that has raged […]

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