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Monthly Archives: January 2018

01.30.18

Discrimination Against People Affected by Leprosy and the Groundbreaking Case of Vidhi Centre for Legal Policy vs. Union of India & Others

By Drew Aiken

  Many thanks to Yashaswini Mittal for her significant contributions to this article, and especially for her and her team’s work at Vidhi Centre for Legal Policy fighting stigma and discrimination against people affected by leprosy in India, through their groundbreaking public interest litigation. image: NDTV.com Last Sunday was World Leprosy Day, an annual opportunity […]

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01.29.18

Understanding Black Women’s Heightened Risk of Maternal Mortality in the U.S.

By Rebecca Reingold

This post was written by Brenna Gautam and Rebecca Reingold.  U.S. maternal mortality ratios are the highest in the developed world and are rising, in contrast to global trends. The national rate, however, hides an even more troubling fact: black women in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white women […]

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01.26.18

The Strange Case of Nodding Syndrome in East Africa

By Mehgan Gallagher

    Nodding Syndrome is described as a rare form of Epilepsy that disables children in Eastern Africa.  Chances are you have never heard of Nodding Syndrome before.  I hadn’t until recently.  This is likely because it is a rare disease that impacts children in East Africa, places the current President of the United States […]

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01.25.18

GULF COUNTRIES IMPOSE NEW TAXES ON TOBACCO AND SUGARY DRINKS, DOUBLING PRICES TO A HISTORICAL HIGH

By Han-Hsi Indy Liu

Hanhsi Indy Liu and Hisham Ali Alsabt are SJD candidates at Georgetown University Law Center. Any questions or comments on this post can be sent to: hl580@georgetown.edu or ha374@georgetown.edu. Arabian Gulf countries, known for their high oil revenues and low tax rates for decades, have recently been suffering from declining oil revenues. To reduce their reliance […]

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01.23.18

Zombie Deer Disease: Is Your Venison Safe?

By Tom Vincent

  If you were around in the 1990s-2000s, you might remember Mad Cow Disease – a disease in cows that can spread to humans via consumption of infected meat, and that leads to a degeneration of the brain and spinal tissue (known as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans).  Despite having a more scientific name—bovine spongiform encephalopathy […]

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01.22.18

"Anchor Babies", "Birth Tourism", and Most Americans' COMPLETE Ignorance of Immigration Law

By Sonia Canzater

The 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution states that: All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. This means that if a mother is present in the U.S. when a child is born, then the child… THE. CHILD… […]

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01.17.18

THE WILLIAMS INSTITUTE RELEASES FIRST-EVER REPORT OF HIV CRIMINALIZATION IN GEORGIA

By Sean Bland

On January 10, 2018, the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law released the first-ever report of HIV criminalization in the US state of Georgia. The report follows previous studies examining available data on all arrests or prosecutions resulting from enforcement of HIV criminalization laws in a single jurisdiction. These studies have been conducted to […]

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01.16.18

Self – Managed Abortion and Embodying the Principles of Reproductive Justice

By O’Neill Institute

*Originally published 1/12/18 by Marlene G. Fried & Susan Yanow on Rewire Worldwide, there is an enormous gap between having the legal right to abortion and being able to access one. This is painfully obvious in the United States. While abortion is legal, its opponents have successfully decreased access to services through restrictive laws; bans […]

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01.10.18

The Framework Convention on Global Health Alliance: Hope Springs Anew for the FCGH and Right to Health

By Eric A. Friedman

It is always spring for human rights. Old ideas embedded in fundamental values do not lose the boundless hope and energy of their birth. In a country that holds its first democratic election or peaceful transition of power, democracy is more than an idea and practice that has existed for centuries, but a new reality worthy […]

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01.02.18

With or without an advisory council, President Trump will be judged on whether he moves us closer to ending the HIV epidemic

By O’Neill Institute

In recent days, the Trump Administration has created an uproar with its abrupt decision to dismiss all members of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA).  This is a troubling development, but one that has the potential to distract us from what matters: working collectively to end the HIV epidemic in the United States and […]

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The views reflected in this expert column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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