Skip to Main Content

Monthly Archives: February 2018

02.27.18

Several modest proposals to improve safety, reduce gun violence, and make Americans happy

By Eric A. Friedman

Over the past month or two, we’ve heard some proposals, both innovative and long-standing, to address violence and joblessness. Let’s start with the President’s suggestion that immigrants who enter our country – whether through several legal immigration routes or as unaccompanied minors – are a great threat to our safety. The proposed solutions are to […]

Thematic Areas:

02.26.18

Post-Nasser: An Opportunity to Change the Culture of Rape Impunity in Michigan?

By Drew Aiken

 photo: BCGavel.com Like so many Michigan State University alumni, I was sickened to hear the details of the Larry Nasser case and the role the university played in impunity for so many appalling crimes against girls and young women—there are allegations of assault against 260 victims.[1] The crisis of sexual assault on campuses and more […]

Categories:
Thematic Areas:

02.23.18

SAVE SMALLPOX! THE CONSERVATION OF ONE OF THE WORLD’S DEADLIEST DISEASES

By O’Neill Institute

This post was written by Michelle Rourke, visiting Fulbright Scholar from the Griffith Law School in Brisbane, Australia. Her article “Never Mind the Science, Here’s the Convention on Biological Diversity: Viral Sovereignty in the Smallpox Destruction Debate” was published in this month’s issue of the Journal of Law and Medicine. You probably don’t need any […]

Categories:
Tags:
Thematic Areas:

02.22.18

The Ebola Footprint – Broader Than You Think

By Tom Vincent

This post was coauthored by Tom Vincent and Dr. Jean-Paul Gonzalez.  Dr. Gonzalez is the Deputy Director of the Center of Excellence in Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases at Kansas State University.   Ebola virus disease is a hemorrhagic febrile illness that has case-fatality rates that vary from 32% to 88% across well-studied outbreaks.  Thankfully, the number of […]

Categories:
Tags:
Thematic Areas:

02.15.18

The Institute's Hepatitis Policy Project Launches New Website

By Sonia Canzater

Sonia Canzater, Hepatitis Policy Associate, and Jeffrey S. Crowley, Program Director of Infectious Disease Initiatives, invite you to visit the Hepatitis Policy Project’s new policy-focused website on hepatitis C. While there is already an abundance of general information available on the etiology, symptoms and transmission of HCV, this site is intended to provide the latest policy actions and […]

Categories:
Tags:
Thematic Areas:

02.15.18

The Truth Behind Home Health Aide Certification Requirements

By Mehgan Gallagher

    Home health aides (HHAs) play an important role in maintaining the health and well-being of the elderly, ill, and disabled.  This role varies from changing bandages and distributing medications, to grocery shopping and helping to pay bills.  Unlike other health care workers who are located in a health care facility, HHAs enter patient […]

Thematic Areas:

02.12.18

Actions Speak Louder than Words: Reclaiming Lost Ground in the Battles Against Viral Hepatitis

By Featured Expert Columnist

Expert Columnist post for the Hepatitis Policy Project at the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law Written by Richard J. Wolitski, PhD, Director, and Corinna Dan, RN, MPH, Viral Hepatitis Policy Advisor Office of HIV/AIDS and Infectious Disease Policy, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Department of Health and Human Services Viral hepatitis […]

Categories:
Thematic Areas:

02.09.18

The Silent Epidemic of Hepatitis C in the United States

By O’Neill Institute

This blog post was authored by Dr. Daniel Lising, Research Assistant for the O’Neill Institute’s Hepatitis Policy Project. Daniel is an LLM in Global Health student at Georgetown University Law Center. In recent months, the spotlight has been trained on the alarming opioid crisis and even the President of the United States declaring it to […]

Tags:
Thematic Areas:

02.06.18

Join a Global Conversation on a New Approach to Reducing Health Inequities

By Eric A. Friedman

The realities of health inequities may be too well known to shock us any longer. People in richer countries live longer than those in poorer countries. And within countries, people who are rich live longer than people who are poor, people with more education longer than people with little schooling. Practically everywhere, certain populations, like […]

Thematic Areas:

02.02.18

New "Conscience and Religious Freedom Division" within Department of Health and Human Services

By Sean Bland

The United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently announced the formation of a new “Conscience and Religious Freedom Division” which will sit in the HHS Office for Civil Rights. HHS says that this new division has been established to “restore federal enforcement of our nation’s laws that protect the fundamental and unalienable […]

Categories:
Thematic Areas:

The views reflected in this expert column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

See the full disclaimer and terms of use.