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Monthly Archives: October 2019

10.29.19

Saving Lives: Access To Medications for Opioid Use Disorder in Jails, Prisons, and Reentry

By O’Neill Institute

This post was written by Shelly Weizman and Somer Brown. “From 2005 to 2015 I was in and out of the system. Most of the time I was a client at the clinic getting methadone, but when I would get incarcerated they just didn’t offer it. It wasn’t available to anyone. I went cold turkey. […]

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Thematic Areas: Addiction & Public Policy

10.28.19

Addiction and Child Welfare Policy: Ensuring Healthier Outcomes for Families

By O’Neill Institute

This post was written by Regina LaBelle, Shelly Weizman, and Somer Brown Megan Webbley, a mother of four, died of a drug overdose on September 29, 2019 in Vermont. Her grieving father wrote the following in her obituary: “To editorialize, I am hoping that the Department for Children and Families rethinks its mission to be […]

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Thematic Areas: Addiction & Public Policy

10.24.19

Privatization of Public Services and the Risks to Human Rights: Alston’s Report on the Digital Welfare State

By Andrés Constantin

Last Friday, October 18th, Philip Alston, Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights, presented his report on human rights and digital welfare states to the UN General Assembly. The report, a result of Alston’s country visits to the UK, the US as well as 60 submissions from 34 countries, warns of the misuse and […]

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Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

10.18.19

More or the same? Reflecting on debates around the Global Fund’s mandate

By Mara Pillinger

Last week, the Global Fund met its replenishment target of $14B. The news was greeted mostly with sighs of relief, especially because it was a near thing. The Global Fund is the largest star in the global health firmament, channeling more money than any other multilateral actor.* It has leveraged this funding to impressive ends. […]

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10.18.19

Utilizing Model Laws to Expand Access to Cancer Treatments in Africa

By Lidiya Teklemariam

WHO reports that 70% of deaths caused by cancer occur in low and middle-income countries where it is very difficult to access diagnosis and treatment leading to late-stage identification of the disease and minimal chance of survival. One of the things that come to my mind when I think of Africa and cancer is the […]

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10.17.19

Democratic Presidential Candidates on Addiction and the Opioid Epidemic

By O’Neill Institute

This post was written by Regina LaBelle, Leigh Bianchi, and Somer Brown. This post was originally published on July 10, 2019 and updated on October 17, 2019. It has been amended to only include the candidates who were present for the Democratic debate held on Tuesday, October 15. As communities across the country continue to struggle […]

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Thematic Areas: Addiction & Public Policy

10.17.19

Family Separation Isn’t New in the U.S.

By Somer Brown

On October 3, the ACLU filed a class action lawsuit seeking damages on behalf of the children and parents “who were forcibly torn from each other under the Trump administration’s illegal practice of separating families at the border.” The complaint discusses the traumatic effects that even brief family separation has on children. Family separation in […]

Thematic Areas: Addiction & Public Policy

10.10.19

Our House is on Fire: Climate Change as a Global Public Health Crisis

By Margherita Cinà

In September, the United Nations Secretary-General convened a Climate Action Summit to mobilize governments, businesses, and civil society organizations to enhance global action and address the undeniable threats from climate change. In his opening statement, UN Secretary-General António Guterres reiterated that: “[t]he best science, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, tells us that […]

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Thematic Areas:

10.04.19

Gun Violence and E-Cigarettes: It Might Be Worth Focusing on Similarities Instead

By Isabel Barbosa

Image by Slyngstad Earlier this month, amid the alarming outbreak of lung injury associated with e-cigarette use in the United States, the Trump Administration announced its intention to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This prompted a response from gun-control advocates, who pointed out that gun deaths vastly outnumber the fatalities attributed to vaping.  Shannon Watts, founder of […]

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Thematic Areas: Non-Communicable Diseases

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