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Monthly Archives: January 2020

01.31.20

Policy Work Is Needed to Eliminate Barriers to Syringe Services Programs

By Sean Bland

Injection drug use has been linked to outbreaks of HIV in several jurisdictions across the United States. In 2014-2015, Scott County, Indiana, experienced an outbreak that involved 181 people being diagnosed with HIV as a result of injection drug use. This HIV outbreak in a rural community that typically saw about 5 HIV diagnoses per […]

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Thematic Areas: Infectious Diseases

01.31.20

Would Argentina Benefit from a Soda Tax?

By Sofia Bobbio

In Argentina 6 out of 10 adults are overweight, this means that it is one of the countries with the highest rates of obese and overweight people for its population ratio: according to the National Survey of Risk Factors 2019 (ENFR), 66.1% of the adult population of Argentina is overweight – 33.1% of the population […]

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01.29.20

President Obama’s Legacy of Leadership on HIV/AIDS

By Jeffrey Crowley

[avatar user=”jsc26″ size=”thumbnail” align=”left” link=”https://oneill.law.georgetown.edu/faculty/Jeffrey-Crowley/” target=”_blank” /] Many of us were surprised last year when President Trump announced in the State of the Union address that he was committing the United States to ending the domestic HIV epidemic over the next decade, by which he meant that his Administration would work to cut annual new […]

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Thematic Areas: Infectious Diseases

01.27.20

National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine Release Report Recommending Improvements to Opioid Use Disorder and Infectious Disease Treatment Services

By Sonia Canzater

On January 23, 2020, the National Academies released a report with recommendations to improve opioid and infectious disease treatment in the U.S. This report was informed by consultations of the nation’s leading experts in addiction medicine, infectious disease, and social determinants of health. The opioid epidemic and increasing rates of infectious diseases such as viral […]

01.27.20

Politics & PHEIC Declarations

By Mara Pillinger

On Thursday, after delaying for an extra day of deliberation, the World Health Organization (WHO) decided not to declare the outbreak of pneumonia caused by a new coronavirus, 2019-nCov, a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC). The International Health Regulations (2005) define a PHEIC as “an extraordinary event that poses a public health risk […]

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01.23.20

Pesticides and Human Rights

By Andrés Constantin

Pesticide use has increased substantially around the world in recent decades, as these chemical products have been found in some cases to increase crop yields, and reduce damage from pests or other invasive crops. This increase, however, has been accompanied by growing concerns about the potential impacts of these products on humans and on the […]

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Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

01.17.20

No room for reproductive choices: forced contraception within the FARC in Colombia

By Isabel Barbosa

Image courtesy of Sputnik Mundo, featuring Olga. A few years ago, Colombia made the headlines after the government signed a peace accord with the FARC (in Spanish, Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia), ending the country’s most famous conflict, which lasted decades. President Juan Manuel Santos even won a Nobel Peace Prize for this. But it […]

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Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

01.09.20

What does International Humanitarian Law has to Offer to Public Health in Situations of Armed Conflict?

By Lidiya Teklemariam

  In Global Health Law, it is clear that we are used to thinking about health-related problems, seeing them in the eyes of laws and know whether such laws could bring or have already brought any favorable changes to peoples’ lives in any way. Conflicts and wars cause catastrophic effects on overall human health. When […]

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Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

01.07.20

We can spare people a painful death for a few dollars a week

By Eric A. Friedman

The nature of life is that we all have to die at some point, but we don’t all have to suffer in dying. We can stave off death for only so long, but we can do far more to mitigate, if not eliminate, the pain that comes at this defining moment of our lives. Yet […]

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The views reflected in this expert column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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