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Author Archives: Eric A. Friedman

02.27.18

Several modest proposals to improve safety, reduce gun violence, and make Americans happy

By Eric A. Friedman

Over the past month or two, we’ve heard some proposals, both innovative and long-standing, to address violence and joblessness. Let’s start with the President’s suggestion that immigrants who enter our country – whether through several legal immigration routes or as unaccompanied minors – are a great threat to our safety. The proposed solutions are to […]

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02.06.18

Join a Global Conversation on a New Approach to Reducing Health Inequities

By Eric A. Friedman

The realities of health inequities may be too well known to shock us any longer. People in richer countries live longer than those in poorer countries. And within countries, people who are rich live longer than people who are poor, people with more education longer than people with little schooling. Practically everywhere, certain populations, like […]

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01.10.18

The Framework Convention on Global Health Alliance: Hope Springs Anew for the FCGH and Right to Health

By Eric A. Friedman

It is always spring for human rights. Old ideas embedded in fundamental values do not lose the boundless hope and energy of their birth. In a country that holds its first democratic election or peaceful transition of power, democracy is more than an idea and practice that has existed for centuries, but a new reality worthy […]

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12.04.17

Syria’s Disappeared and Humanity at Its Worst – and Best

By Eric A. Friedman

[I thank Noor Shakfeh, a Syrian-American who has lost family members to the Syrian regime, and Sara Afshar, who directed and produced Syria’s Disappeared, for inspiring this piece, and for deepening my own understanding of solidarity.] Though they have disappeared from the headlines, the depravities of the Syrian regime during the war that has raged […]

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11.01.17

From skilled birth attendants to extreme poverty, truths behind statistics

By Eric A. Friedman

In an era where established facts are questioned – the massive evidence on climate change and the massive dearth of evidence on voter fraud in the United States, for example – it is worth bearing in mind the following: While believing falsehoods and outright lies and not believing truths can cause great harm, skepticism is indeed […]

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10.12.17

Nobel Peace Prize 2017 and the Power of International Legal Norms

By Eric A. Friedman

With the nuclear threat is on the rise, I was a bit surprised last week when I heard that the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) had won the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize. It seemed out of step with today’s reality. But as I reflected more and learned the reasoning behind the decision, the Nobel Committee’s […]

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09.12.17

Taking health in all policies seriously: health impact assessments, WHO leadership, and international law

By Eric A. Friedman

[This blog was co-authored by Eric A. Friedman and Gian Luca Burci, and first appeared as a Lancet Global Health blog.] Government approval of a new mining operation. A policy to deport undocumented immigrants. An international agreement that enhances pharmaceutical patent protections. All will affect health and health equity, but will policymakers factor these effects […]

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08.29.17

The Hillside by Freetown: Terror of Another Sort

By Eric A. Friedman

I have not yet heard back from a friend in Sierra Leone. I wrote to him after the devastating mudslide on the outskirts of Freetown early on the morning on August 14. I’m not too worried though. He is serving as a magistrate, working to construct a judiciary that advances human rights. I don’t think […]

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07.06.17

Reflections on O'Neill Institute health rights litigation intensive 2017

By Eric A. Friedman

Do the courts, and does the law more generally, have the power to advance the right to health? It would be hard to conclude at the end the O’Neill Institute’s weeklong Health Rights Litigation Intensive anything other than an emphatic yes — even while acknowledging limitations of health rights litigation, and exploring questions that make […]

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07.06.17

Reflections on O’Neill Institute health rights litigation intensive 2017

By Eric A. Friedman

Do the courts, and does the law more generally, have the power to advance the right to health? It would be hard to conclude at the end the O’Neill Institute’s weeklong Health Rights Litigation Intensive anything other than an emphatic yes — even while acknowledging limitations of health rights litigation, and exploring questions that make […]

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The views reflected in this blog are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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