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Author Archives: O’Neill Institute

06.30.20

COVID’s Constitutional Conundrum

By O’Neill Institute

This blog post was written by James G. Hodge, Jr., J.D., LL.M. and Hanna Reinke. Extant threats of the COVID-19 pandemic extend well beyond the health of Americans. Unprecedented emergency legal preparedness and response efforts to quell the pandemic are testing core legal foundations globally. In the United States, federally-declared dual states of general emergency […]

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06.04.20

COVID-19: Sounding the Alarm to Revisit National Tobacco Control Measure in India

By O’Neill Institute

This post was written by Kashish Aneja and Dr. Ravi Mehrotra World No Tobacco Day is observed around the globe every year on May 31. This year it holds unparalleled significance in light of the extraordinary global health circumstances we find ourselves in. There is an emerging correlation between tobacco and COVID-19 that reinforces the need […]

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06.02.20

Defunding the WHO Will Hurt African Health Programs

By O’Neill Institute

Authors: Amy Patterson, Professor of Politics, University of the South; Emmanuel Balogun, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Skidmore College The Main Point: In addition to supporting work on AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and maternal and child health in Africa, funding the WHO lets the U.S. engage in global health diplomacy in the region. This collaboration is […]

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06.02.20

The American Public Trusts the WHO. That’s Vitally Important.

By O’Neill Institute

Author: Renu Singh, Fellow, O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University Law Center The Main Point: Public trust in the WHO matters. Because more than three-quarters of Americans trust the WHO to manage the COVID-19 response, the organization’s scientifically-driven recommendations can change individual behavior despite government noncooperation – so long as it […]

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04.16.20

A Brief Reflection of the Gaps with Public Health Emergency Laws in China

By O’Neill Institute

This blog was written by Jingyi Xu, SJD Candidate at Georgetown University Law Center The widespread of COVID-19 has invoked a heated discussion of public health emergency laws in China, where the coronavirus is originally from. Recently, central government of China has made a huge decision to revise the current public health emergency laws while […]

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03.30.20

EXPANDING ACCESS TO M-OUD IN DRUG TREATMENT COURTS MUST INCLUDE EXPANSION OF COMMUNITY-BASED TREATMENT CENTERS

By O’Neill Institute

Written by Sonia Canzater, Senior Associate, and Regina LaBelle, Director of the Addiction and Public Policy Initiative. Treatment courts (also known as drug courts), provide alternatives to incarceration and access to treatment for justice-involved individuals with substance use disorders.  The more than 3,000 treatment courts across the country reflect their local communities, communities that too […]

Thematic Areas: Addiction & Public Policy

03.27.20

A Public Health Framework for Implementing Economic and Social Supports

By O’Neill Institute

This post was written by O’Neill Institute Senior Scholar, John Monahan.   A Public Health Framework for Implementing Economic and Social Supports Now that President Trump has signed a $2 trillion-plus Coronavirus response law (along with two other pandemic-related funding bills earlier this month), attention will rightly shift to federal, state, and county agencies charged […]

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03.20.20

Drug Courts and COVID-19

By O’Neill Institute

This post was written by Regina LaBelle and Shelly Weizman Given the increasing rates of confirmed cases of COVID-19 nationwide and CDC guidance, courts across the country have suspended operations and many, such as Vermont and Pennsylvania, have declared judicial emergencies. Such judicial emergencies allow for an orderly suspension of court operations, delaying deadlines and […]

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Thematic Areas: Addiction & Public Policy

The views reflected in this blog are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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