Skip to Main Content

02.15.20

Pandemics Do Have Borders

By Mara Pillinger

One of the most common refrains in global health security is that pandemics don’t respect national borders. But the COVID-19 epidemic has turned up the heat under simmering disputes over Taiwan’s and Hong Kong’s status vis-à-vis the People’s Republic of China, reminding us that politics of sovereignty and autonomy don’t stop for pandemics, either. The […]

Tags:

02.12.20

Behind the Headlines: 10 Million Deaths From Antimicrobial Resistance by 2050 (or Not?)

By Eric A. Friedman

One of the greatest health threats of our time, one that grows by the year, is antimicrobial resistance. Bacteria and other microbes develop mutations that protect them against antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs, meaning that infections, including deadly ones, that we can now treat will become more difficult — even possible — to treat. The […]

Categories:

02.11.20

TOBACCO CONTROL: EVIDENCE THAT AN INTERNATIONAL REGIME ON GLOBAL HEALTH MAY STILL BE POSSIBLE

By Gonzalo Hünicken

In an era in which governments withdraw from international commitments, prioritize national policies and seem reluctant to cooperate at a multilateral level, a global instrument reaffirming the right to health may look impossible. Yet, in the midst of this exacerbated nationalism, there are advocates for a Framework Convention for Global Health (FCGH), a treaty aimed […]

Tags:
Thematic Areas:

02.10.20

Child Euthanasia in Belgium

By Rebecca Reingold

This post was written by Leticia Mora, Research Assistant at the O’Neill Institute, and Rebecca Reingold.   Belgium has long been one of the most progressive countries when it comes to euthanasia. In 2002, Belgium formally legalized euthanasia by way of the Belgian Euthanasia Act, which allowed euthanasia for adults who experience “constant and unbearable physical […]

Categories:
Thematic Areas:

02.07.20

What does the Super Bowl have to do with Noncommunicable Diseases?

By Margherita Cinà

Last Sunday, I participated for the first time* in the great American tradition of watching the Super Bowl. During my emersion into this experience, I learned that every year, Super Bowl Nation awaits in anticipation for the commercials: they seem to be almost as important as the game itself! This year’s commercials, which reached on […]

Tags:
Thematic Areas: Non-Communicable Diseases

01.31.20

Policy Work Is Needed to Eliminate Barriers to Syringe Services Programs

By Sean Bland

Injection drug use has been linked to outbreaks of HIV in several jurisdictions across the United States. In 2014-2015, Scott County, Indiana, experienced an outbreak that involved 181 people being diagnosed with HIV as a result of injection drug use. This HIV outbreak in a rural community that typically saw about 5 HIV diagnoses per […]

Tags:
Thematic Areas: Infectious Diseases

01.31.20

Would Argentina Benefit from a Soda Tax?

By Sofia Bobbio

In Argentina 6 out of 10 adults are overweight, this means that it is one of the countries with the highest rates of obese and overweight people for its population ratio: according to the National Survey of Risk Factors 2019 (ENFR), 66.1% of the adult population of Argentina is overweight – 33.1% of the population […]

Tags:

01.29.20

President Obama’s Legacy of Leadership on HIV/AIDS

By Jeffrey Crowley

[avatar user=”jsc26″ size=”thumbnail” align=”left” link=”https://oneill.law.georgetown.edu/faculty/Jeffrey-Crowley/” target=”_blank” /] Many of us were surprised last year when President Trump announced in the State of the Union address that he was committing the United States to ending the domestic HIV epidemic over the next decade, by which he meant that his Administration would work to cut annual new […]

Categories:
Thematic Areas: Infectious Diseases

01.27.20

National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine Release Report Recommending Improvements to Opioid Use Disorder and Infectious Disease Treatment Services

By Sonia Canzater

On January 23, 2020, the National Academies released a report with recommendations to improve opioid and infectious disease treatment in the U.S. This report was informed by consultations of the nation’s leading experts in addiction medicine, infectious disease, and social determinants of health. The opioid epidemic and increasing rates of infectious diseases such as viral […]

01.27.20

Politics & PHEIC Declarations

By Mara Pillinger

On Thursday, after delaying for an extra day of deliberation, the World Health Organization (WHO) decided not to declare the outbreak of pneumonia caused by a new coronavirus, 2019-nCov, a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC). The International Health Regulations (2005) define a PHEIC as “an extraordinary event that poses a public health risk […]

Categories:
Tags:
Thematic Areas:

The views reflected in this blog are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

See the full disclaimer and terms of use.