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Category Archives: Healthcare

04.16.20

A Brief Reflection of the Gaps with Public Health Emergency Laws in China

By O’Neill Institute

This blog was written by Jingyi Xu, SJD Candidate at Georgetown University Law Center The widespread of COVID-19 has invoked a heated discussion of public health emergency laws in China, where the coronavirus is originally from. Recently, central government of China has made a huge decision to revise the current public health emergency laws while […]

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02.27.20

The difficulties in the implementation of the Right to Health in Argentina

By Sofia Bobbio

In Argentina the right to health is guaranteed in the text of the National Constitution and in the International Human Rights Treaties incorporated into our constitution. However, Argentina has faced some difficulties in the implementation of this right. Some of the biggest challenges the country has faced relate to the access to the health system, […]

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10.18.19

Utilizing Model Laws to Expand Access to Cancer Treatments in Africa

By Lidiya Teklemariam

WHO reports that 70% of deaths caused by cancer occur in low and middle-income countries where it is very difficult to access diagnosis and treatment leading to late-stage identification of the disease and minimal chance of survival. One of the things that come to my mind when I think of Africa and cancer is the […]

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10.01.19

Universal health coverage: The numbers behind the headlines

By Eric A. Friedman

At the end of this posting, which is mostly about universal health coverage, please see the update on actions that, if you are in the United States, you can take to create some measure of accountability for those responsible for the genocide of the Rohingya people in Burma and to end U.S. involvement in the […]

08.07.19

National Immunization Awareness Month Means It’s Time We All Do Our Part

By Darlene Huang

August is National Immunization Awareness Month. The annual observance highlights the importance of getting recommended vaccines throughout life. It emphasizes that vaccines aren’t just for kids; adults need to get vaccinated, too. Its timing, though, is an especially helpful reminder for students and their parents as back-to-school time nears. All 50 U.S. states require some […]

08.04.19

The Humanitarian Crisis in Venezuela and the Burden on Girls and Women

By Isabel Barbosa

This post was written by Santiago Martínez-Neira, consultant to the International Commission of Jurists, and Isabel Barbosa. Image courtesy of Human Rights Watch It is well known that Venezuela is going through a humanitarian crisis. Beyond the political and economic implications of this sad outcome, the crisis reminds us that, in such scenarios, girls and […]

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Thematic Areas: Healthcare

07.01.19

Health equity and the upcoming UN High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage

By Eric A. Friedman

In September, the United Nations will convene a High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage (UHC), with heads of state encouraged to attend. As typical for such meetings, a key outcome with be a political declaration, in this case on countries’ commitments around UHC. In May, a “zero draft” was made publicly available; as states negotiate […]

06.24.19

The judicialization of health goes beyond healthcare

By Isabel Barbosa

Image courtesy of Mancia.org For a long time, the debate about the judicialization of health has focused on access to healthcare — such as access to medication and/or surgeries. Year after year, as lawsuits piled up, courts have debated whether the right to health means that individuals are entitled to certain treatments. Scholars have also […]

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06.12.19

USPSTF Recommendation for PrEP: Reflections on Insurance Coverage and HIV Prevention for Older Adults

By Sean Bland

Yesterday the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a federally-appointed independent panel of clinicians and scientists that conducts evidence-based reviews of preventive services, issued a final “Grade A” recommendation for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). An “A” letter grade indicates that the panel recommends the service and finds there is high certainty that the service has a substantial […]

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Thematic Areas: Infectious Diseases

The views reflected in this blog are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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