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08.02.19

State Legislators and the Opioid Epidemic: Not Yet Out of the Woods

By O’Neill Institute

Regina LaBelle and Shelly Weizman are Director and Associate Director, respectively, of the Addiction and Public Policy Initiative at Georgetown University Law Center. LaBelle served as Chief of Staff in the Office of National Drug Control Policy in the Obama Administration. Weizman was Assistant Secretary for Mental Hygiene in Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Administration. Leigh Bianchi, […]

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Thematic Areas: Addiction & Public Policy

07.22.19

Y2K Implicated in 2019: DATA to MATA, the Opioid Epidemic, and Buprenorphine

By Fabian Lucero

Drug overdoses in the U.S. cause more deaths annually than gun violence and motor-vehicle collisions combined. In 2017 alone 70,237 Americans died from drug overdose, 67.8% of those deaths are specifically attributed to opioids. Though we are in the midst of a public health crisis, there are possible solutions to reduce morbidity and mortality through Medication-Assisted […]

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07.02.19

Applying the Evidence: Legal and Policy Approaches to Address Opioid Use Disorder in the Criminal Justice and Child Welfare Settings

By Johan Marulanda

The O’Neill Institute’s Addiction and Public Policy Initiative is partnering with Business for Impact at the McDonough School of Business to host this event. Communities across the country have prioritized increased access to treatment medications for opioid use disorder. Many systems that formerly discouraged or even prohibited use of medications like methadone and buprenorphine – […]

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Thematic Areas: Addiction & Public Policy

The views reflected in this expert column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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