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01.07.20

We can spare people a painful death for a few dollars a week

By Eric A. Friedman

The nature of life is that we all have to die at some point, but we don’t all have to suffer in dying. We can stave off death for only so long, but we can do far more to mitigate, if not eliminate, the pain that comes at this defining moment of our lives. Yet […]

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12.16.19

Righting wrongs: America’s duty to mistreated asylum seekers and immigrants

By Eric A. Friedman

Democratic presidential contenders have shown admirable support for immigrants, who have been routinely and cruelly targeted by the present administration. Perhaps nothing demonstrated this support more than a moment back in June, when during the second night of the first round of Democratic debates, all ten candidates on the stage raised their hands when the […]

Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

12.13.19

An International Human Right to Die with Dignity?

By Rebecca Reingold

This post was written by Leticia Mora, Research Assistant at the O’Neill Institute, and Rebecca Reingold.  Paul Lamb, a 63-year-old man who was paralyzed from the neck down following a car crash nearly 30 years ago, recently said: “The worst thing in the world is for someone to say ‘you’re going to be in pain […]

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Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

12.09.19

HEALTH INFORMATION APP-SHARING: A BALANCE BETWEEN INNOVATION AND PRIVACY

By Laura Norato

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHS) has recently proposed rules on medical information sharing, intended to make it easier for patients receiving medical records and understand their treatment choices through their smartphone’s apps. The rules require health providers to send medical information to third-party apps after a patient has authorized the data exchange. […]

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Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

11.25.19

Stigma and Discrimination: Still Destroying Lives

By Eric A. Friedman

We know how pervasive the most flagrant discrimination used to be when it came to people with mental disabilities and people with HIV. People with mental disabilities were once warehoused in institutions, apart from society, perhaps treated forever as children, without rights of their own. They were dubbed “retarded,” “insane,” even “mad,” rather than people […]

11.08.19

Mexico to adopt front-of-package warning labels in the fight for healthy foods

By Isabel Barbosa

On October 22, Mexico’s legislators passed a bill to reform the General Health Law (in Spanish, “Ley General de Salud”) to include front-of-package warning labels. In both the House of Representatives and the Senate, the bill passed in a landslide: in the House of Representatives, there were 458 in favor, 2 abstentions, 0 against; in the Senate, 114 […]

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10.24.19

Privatization of Public Services and the Risks to Human Rights: Alston’s Report on the Digital Welfare State

By Andrés Constantin

Last Friday, October 18th, Philip Alston, Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights, presented his report on human rights and digital welfare states to the UN General Assembly. The report, a result of Alston’s country visits to the UK, the US as well as 60 submissions from 34 countries, warns of the misuse and […]

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Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

10.01.19

Universal health coverage: The numbers behind the headlines

By Eric A. Friedman

At the end of this posting, which is mostly about universal health coverage, please see the update on actions that, if you are in the United States, you can take to create some measure of accountability for those responsible for the genocide of the Rohingya people in Burma and to end U.S. involvement in the […]

09.27.19

Migrants’ Access to Healthcare: Data Wanted

By Mara Pillinger

Countries’ obligations to respond to the health needs of migrants (including regular and irregular migrants, refugees, and asylum-seekers) was a topic of conversation at the O’Neill Institute this week. In 2016, the UN General Assembly adopted the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, which proclaims Member States’ “commit[ment] to protecting the safety, dignity and […]

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09.17.19

Vaccines and Adolescent Decision-Making: Part 3

By Rebecca Reingold

This post was written by Francesca Nardi, former intern at the O’Neill Institute, and Rebecca Reingold.  Other countries take various approaches to regulating the provision of childhood and adolescent vaccines, and many afford significantly greater deference to adolescents’ decision-making capacity than the U.S. Many of these approaches recognize that imposing fixed age restrictions on adolescent […]

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Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

The views reflected in this expert column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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