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Monthly Archives: July 2017

07.27.17

HIV, Racial Justice, and Legal Organizations Release “Consensus Statement on HIV ‘Treatment as Prevention’ in Criminal Law Reform”

By Sean Bland

This blog post was authored by Sean Bland and Javier Saladich, a Summer Research Intern at the O’Neill Institute and a third-year law student at ESADE Business and Law School in Barcelona, Spain. Earlier this month, a group of organizations and advocates released a “Consensus Statement on HIV ‘Treatment as Prevention’ in Criminal Law Reform”. […]

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07.26.17

House Appropriations Committee passes FY2018 health services budget bill that offers no additional funding for HIV or viral hepatitis initiatives; does not acknowledge the rising rates of Hepatitis C infections in the U.S.

By Sonia Canzater

In a vote that followed party lines, the House Appropriations Committee passed the FY2018 Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill on July 20, 2017. The bill rejects most of the proposed cuts to health services recommended by the current Administration, but does little to boost funding for health services that desperately […]

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07.25.17

How the Built Environment Can Impact your Health

By Mehgan Gallagher

Improving your health can be as simple as choosing to walk to work or to take the stairs instead of the escalator.  However, stairs are not even a viable option in some buildings and for some people it is not feasible to walk or bike to work.  This blog post examines how public health is […]

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07.20.17

Monkey Business: Ebola Research is Benefitted by Recent Discovery

By Tom Vincent

Rhesus monkey (Image source)   A new study published this week in Nature Microbiology brings good news for research toward the persistence of Ebola virus in asymptomatic individuals. Ebola virus (EBOV) is the virus that causes Ebola (now referred to as Ebola virus disease, or EVD), a viral hemorrhagic fever that has a very high […]

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07.17.17

Countering the negative public health impacts of the anti-vaccination movement

By O’Neill Institute

This blog post was authored by Javier Saladich, a Summer Research Intern at the O’Neill Institute. Javier is a third year law student at ESADE Business and Law School in Barcelona, Spain. Any comments or questions can be emailed to javier.saladich@esade.edu. In light of recent measles outbreaks in Europe and the United States and a […]

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07.11.17

Financial Security as a Public Health Good: Cash Transfers Can Improve Individual and Family Health

By O’Neill Institute

Neil Sircar, J.D., is an LL.M Candidate in Global Health Law at Georgetown University Law Center & the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. Any questions or comments related to this post can be directed to nrs53@georgetown.edu. Universal Basic Income (UBI), also known as Basic Income Guarantee (BIG), has been increasingly discussed in […]

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07.07.17

Hepatitis Policy Project Releases Recommendations to Improve Monitoring of the Hepatitis C Epidemic in the U.S.

By Sonia Canzater

The O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law’s Hepatitis Policy Project recently released a report offering recommendations to strengthen data collection and monitoring of cases of Hepatitis C in the U.S. in order for public health authorities to gain a better understanding of the effects of the disease and most effective strategies to curb […]

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07.06.17

Reflections on O’Neill Institute health rights litigation intensive 2017

By Eric A. Friedman

Do the courts, and does the law more generally, have the power to advance the right to health? It would be hard to conclude at the end the O’Neill Institute’s weeklong Health Rights Litigation Intensive anything other than an emphatic yes — even while acknowledging limitations of health rights litigation, and exploring questions that make […]

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07.06.17

Reflections on O'Neill Institute health rights litigation intensive 2017

By Eric A. Friedman

Do the courts, and does the law more generally, have the power to advance the right to health? It would be hard to conclude at the end the O’Neill Institute’s weeklong Health Rights Litigation Intensive anything other than an emphatic yes — even while acknowledging limitations of health rights litigation, and exploring questions that make […]

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The views reflected in this expert column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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