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Monthly Archives: May 2018

05.31.18

Hepatitis Policy Project Releases New Report Telling the Stories of People Affected by Hepatitis C

By Sonia Canzater

The Institute’s Hepatitis Policy Project has released a new report that features the stories of people affected by hepatitis C. The report was authored by Sonia Canzater and Jeffrey S. Crowley. “Full of Life: The Stories of People Affected by Hepatitis C,” underscores the impact of hepatitis C and the potential for improving the lives of those with […]

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05.28.18

Inequality in Namibia: Decreasing but Still Significant

By Drew Aiken

Namibia is an upper middle-income country where prosperity is not shared by everyone; pervasive inequality persists in Namibia and only a small proportion of people in Namibia live under conditions of an upper-middle income country. Having lived under apartheid until independence in 1990, significant disparity in health, wealth and in many other facets of life […]

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05.20.18

A New and Unsettling Force for Health and Beyond—The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival

By John Stephens

In the year before his murder in April 1968, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King embarked on a new era of justice work in which he aligned with organized labor and the poor to unite a movement across racial, gender, ethnic, religious, and geographic lines. King’s “Poor People’s Campaign” marked the connections between the various […]

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05.16.18

A Lack of Consensus around Surrogacy Regulation at the National Level

By Rebecca Reingold

For many years, surrogacy laws around the world have been in flux. Currently, the Canadian Parliament is considering a bill that would repeal the current legal prohibitions against paying for a surrogate. In the UK, the Law Commission of England and Wales and the Scottish Law Commission have announced they will review various laws that regulate surrogacy as […]

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05.10.18

The Changing Relevance of Material Transfer Agreements for Infectious Disease Research

By O’Neill Institute

By Sam Halabi and Michelle Rourke               On May 3 and 4, 2018, the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law hosted experts from academia, government, the World Health Organization and the private sector to discuss the changing relevance of Material Transfer Agreements (MTAs) for infectious disease research. […]

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05.09.18

The Mental Health Implications of Gender Discrimination in the Workplace

By Drew Aiken

  image: the Chronicle To anyone who has experienced gender or other forms of discrimination, in the workplace or outside, it is likely unsurprising that pay disparity—one of the clearest markers of discrimination –is linked with anxiety and depression. In addition to pay discrimination on the basis of gender, other manifestations of workplace discrimination include […]

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05.01.18

Protecting Privacy and Confidentiality for People Living with HIV

By Sean Bland

The right to privacy and confidentiality for health information is deeply rooted in American history and tradition and in federal and state law. People living with HIV also have special concerns in keeping their health information private. These individuals have long faced harassment, discrimination, and stigma from society because of their HIV infection, and they […]

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The views reflected in this expert column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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