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Monthly Archives: November 2018

11.30.18

Human Capital Index as a Tool for Civil Society Accountability

By Laura Norato

The best-known measure for determining the size (and success) of a country is the gross domestic product (GDP), which represents the monetary value of the goods and services that a particular economy produces in a given period. However, the GDP fails to reflect a population’s actual wellbeing or the wealth distribution since, for example, it […]

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11.27.18

What’s “Special” about the System of United Nations Special Procedures?

By O’Neill Institute

This article was written by Thérèse Murphy, Professor of Law and Director of the Health & Human Rights Unit at Queen’s University Belfast, and Amrei Müller, a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow within the Health & Human Rights Unit. The United Nations Special Procedures are far more interesting than their title suggests, and we argue it […]

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11.20.18

Trump Administration Further Restricts Coverage of Reproductive Health Care

By Rebecca Reingold

This post was written by Emily Fruchterman, Research Assistant at the O’Neill Institute, and Rebecca Reingold. The day after the midterm elections, the Trump administration released a series of new rules likely to have a troubling impact on American women’s access to reproductive care. The first two are final rules that significantly expand the ability of employers […]

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Thematic Areas: Healthcare

11.20.18

The O’Neill Institute Hosts Its World AIDS Day Event on November 30: Innovative Approaches to HIV Treatment and Prevention

By Sean Bland

In recognition of World AIDS Day, the O’Neill Institute is hosting a brown bag lunch discussion on innovative approaches to HIV treatment and prevention. The event will take place on Friday, November 30, 2018 from 12:00-1:30pm at the Georgetown University Law Center in McDonough Hall Room 200. It will include a discussion of the following […]

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Thematic Areas: Infectious Diseases

11.16.18

More Doctors: Brazil’s program to improve access to healthcare suffers severe blow

By Isabel Barbosa

Image courtesy of Karina Zambrana/ASCOM This week, the Brazilian healthcare program More Doctors (in Portuguese, “Mais Médicos”) suffered a severe blow as Cuba announced it would no longer participate. Launched by the government of former president Dilma Rousseff, More Doctors is a program created to improve access to healthcare in the public health system, by placing physicians […]

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11.16.18

Suicide in Prisons and Jails: A Growing Concern

By Mehgan Gallagher

Photo Credit: Urdupoint.com Suicide among inmates in prisons and jails in the United States and abroad is a serious concern.  The United States has lower rates of suicide in prison compared to Western European and Nordic countries   However, compared to other nations, the United States has the highest prison population in the world and rates […]

Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

11.09.18

Swift legal intervention mitigates a drug-resistant tuberculosis outbreak in Malawian prisons, but the worst could still be ahead

By John Stephens

A recent outbreak of drug-resistant tuberculosis in Malawian prisons should be a wake up call. It shouldn’t be a surprise that six people in Malawi’s nightmarishly congested prisons contracted drug-resistant TB—the prisons provide ideal conditions for the bacteria to thrive and spread. This is true of many prisons throughout the world, especially in countries with high […]

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11.05.18

Being Sick Can Land You in Jail: Hepatitis C Criminalization

By Sonia Canzater

Several U.S. states have laws that criminalize knowingly exposing another to viral hepatitis or other infectious diseases. The definitions of the crimes and severity of penalties vary. Some states specifically target diseases such as HIV and viral hepatitis in the statutes, while others impose penalties for exposing others to any infectious diseases.  While opinions on […]

Thematic Areas: Infectious Diseases

11.02.18

The Inter-American Court of Human Rights issues ruling on the progressive realization of the right to health

By Isabel Barbosa

Image courtesy of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights The past couple of years have brought interesting developments regarding the adjudication of the right to health at an international level. Following years of debate within the legal community as to the possibility of direct adjudication of social, economic and cultural rights under the American Convention […]

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Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

The views reflected in this expert column are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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