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Category Archives: Healthcare

06.24.19

The judicialization of health goes beyond healthcare

By Isabel Barbosa

Image courtesy of Mancia.org For a long time, the debate about the judicialization of health has focused on access to healthcare — such as access to medication and/or surgeries. Year after year, as lawsuits piled up, courts have debated whether the right to health means that individuals are entitled to certain treatments. Scholars have also […]

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06.12.19

USPSTF Recommendation for PrEP: Reflections on Insurance Coverage and HIV Prevention for Older Adults

By Sean Bland

Yesterday the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a federally-appointed independent panel of clinicians and scientists that conducts evidence-based reviews of preventive services, issued a final “Grade A” recommendation for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). An “A” letter grade indicates that the panel recommends the service and finds there is high certainty that the service has a substantial […]

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Thematic Areas: Infectious Diseases

05.17.19

Epidemiology Makes It to Court: from Tobacco to Herbicides

By Isabel Barbosa

Image courtesy of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University  Can companies be held responsible for cancer caused by their herbicides? Courts have been saying yes, and the latest verdict came from a jury in state court in Oakland, California. Last week, they ordered Bayer to pay more than $2 billion in damages […]

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04.01.19

Birth Plans and Obstetric Violence: The Question We Should Be Asking

By Isabel Barbosa

Image courtesy of Quartz Many of the debates about reproductive health revolve around the autonomy of women during pregnancy and labor. This is most apparent, of course, in the discussions about pregnancy termination, but it also shows in the broader issue of obstetric violence. Earlier this year, the Regional Council of Medicine in Rio de […]

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Thematic Areas: Health & Human Rights

02.20.19

Congressional Briefing on American Indian Women’s Reproductive Health

By Rebecca Reingold

Congresswoman Deb Haaland (D-NM) was part of the record-breaking wave of women candidates who won in the 2018 mid-terms. She and Sharice Davids are the first two American Indian women elected to the U.S. Congress. Now that she is in Washington, Rep. Haaland is bringing attention to the devastating reproductive health challenges faced by American Indian […]

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01.23.19

The situation of access to health services in El Salvador

By Andrés Constantin

This post was written by Patricio López Turconi, Intern at the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, and Andrés Constantin. Women El Salvador has sought to reduce inequality in access to health services for women through its 2011 Law on Equality, Equity and Elimination of Discrimination against Women (Decree N° 645). Article 26 […]

11.16.18

More Doctors: Brazil’s program to improve access to healthcare suffers severe blow

By Isabel Barbosa

Image courtesy of Karina Zambrana/ASCOM This week, the Brazilian healthcare program More Doctors (in Portuguese, “Mais Médicos”) suffered a severe blow as Cuba announced it would no longer participate. Launched by the government of former president Dilma Rousseff, More Doctors is a program created to improve access to healthcare in the public health system, by placing physicians […]

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10.25.18

Medical Discrimination Against Transgender Persons

By O’Neill Institute

This blog post was written by Brenna Gautam, Research Assistant at the O’Neill Institute and a 3L at Georgetown University Law Center.  On October 11, 2018, a jury awarded two transgender women $780,000 after a federal judge ruled that Wisconsin’s ban on gender treatment in state employee insurance plans violates federal law. The plaintiffs can […]

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Thematic Areas: Healthcare

10.15.18

Troubling Effects on Health of Trump’s Proposed “Public Charge” Rule

By Rebecca Reingold

This post was written by Brenna Gautam and Rebecca Reingold.  On September 21, 2018, the Secretary of Homeland Security signed a proposed rule that would allow immigration officials to refuse admission and deny visa extensions to immigrants who use public benefits, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Medicaid, and federally-funded housing assistance programs. […]

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08.09.18

New Study Develops The Most Comprehensive Dataset of U.S. Hepatitis C Patients and Epidemiology

By Sonia Canzater

A recent study published in July 2018 in the journal Advances in Therapy discusses the findings made by researchers who compiled the most comprehensive dataset available to describe the current hepatitis C landscape in the U.S. The study covers from 2013-2016, and, among other concerning statistics, shows a 234% increase in confirmed hepatitis C positive patients […]

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